Letter XV

Letter XV of the King’s Cabinet starts as a normal doting letter from the King to his Queen saying how much he loved her confidence in their relationship saying he “infinitely [finds] joy in the expressions of thy condiment love” of him. He goes on to say that anyone who does not even pretend to be a fond of their relationship is misguided and a liar because their love is true. He goes on and on about how true their love is and how caring and kind the Queen is to him. He brings God into his letter saying that he professes to God that he has never seen such a love as the love she offers him. He is very repetitive in saying that their love is a strong and he does not find any faults in her. The King then refers to the Treaty which started the day he wrote the letter.

This treaty, from what I researched into, was the Treaty of Ripon in 1640 which brought peace to the Bishop’s War. The Bishop’s War started as a result to the suspicions over Charles I’s aims in what he was doing as a monarch regarding him imposing a new Prayer book especially after he married Henrietta Maria, the French Roman Catholic woman. Religion was a huge issue in England and Scotland and what the King really believed in. In the letter, Charles I assures the Queen that she should be confident in what he was doing and doesn’t want to abandon his friends through his actions.

With his letter he included his directions to his Commissioners and references a Digby which upon research is a George Digby who was in the House of Commons and then the House of Lords. He was of course a Royalist but his character was questioned by the advice that he gave to the King a lot of the time. The King says that Digby will explain the directions he gave to his Commissioners and other political and military matters she may be concerned about. The letter also talks about a political move he my make from a proposition he got that included a sum of money and his son marrying the master’s son of the King of Spain.

These letters as described in the annotation are meant to be like a “drawing of this Curtain” between the reality and ideal version of who King Charles I was as a ruler and where his loyalties really stood during his reign. These letters were never meant to be published for the public to see just like the information that Edward Snowden hacked was not meant to be seen publicly either. Though Snowden thought that he was in the right for leaking the information to the public because “things need to be determined by the public and not by somebody who was simply hired by the government” (Ludlow). That is the same idea that went along with publishing these letters between the King, Queen, and Odmon. The public needed to form an opinion and not have everything kept behind closed doors. The preface clearly said that the goal that was to come from publishing the letters was to have the reader be “abundantly satisfied with these letters here printed and take notice therefrom, how the Court has been caiolde….[and]Papists and we the more believing sort of Protestants, by the Court” (7). That the letters were to be persuasive and give the reader an option to open their mind to the King’s views seen here in his personal letters.

The letters play an interesting role in being publicized to let the people form an opinion on the true feelings and words of the King in his, what he assumed were going to be, private letters. The public needed to form an opinion on the King because the King is the leader of the people and there was much controversy over his choice of wife during this time. By showing these letter, the relationship between the King and Queen can be shown and analyzed by the public. It is necessary for the public to have an opinion over him because these letters shed some light onto what type of man he was. This letter plays an interesting role in seeing how much the King shares with his wife about all of the on-goings in the kingdom and how controversial their relationship can be seen because of her influence. The King makes a strong point to emphasize how wrong any one would be in questioning their relationship saying they aren’t loyal to the Crown if they are in fact having doubts about the relationship. The King specifically says that the Queen can be informed of all information if she asks Digby. It is also interesting that the King didn’t just mail his directions directly to his Commissioners but instead sent them through the Queen. This shows how much went through the Queen and emphasizes the relationship that they had. The public can look at all of this to see what kind of man was leading their country and see where his decisions came from. The public’s lives are based solely on the actions of the King. They needed to know how he felt about her being a French Catholic woman to see what he would do about other Catholics in the country. The people’s religious freedom is being looked at here. The people want to know if he is okay with Catholics in his country since he married one. Where does the King stand on Catholicism and religious freedom in his country? That is what the public is forming their opinion about. And this controversial relationship is shown here in this particular letter for those reasons.

Works cited:

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/the-banality-of-systemic-evil/?_r=1

http://www.royal.gov.uk/HistoryoftheMonarchy/Scottish%20Monarchs(400ad-1603)/DescendantsofMalcolmIII/CharlesI.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Digby,_2nd_Earl_of_Bristol

https://engl382fall2013.wordpress.com/readings/0924-the-english-civil-war/

https://engl382fall2013.wordpress.com/readings/0926-the-edward-snowden-case/

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3 thoughts on “Letter XV

  1. Sarah,

    You have done a good job researching the people described in this letter and of explaining its background. However, I need you to cite the annotations or preface and relate the letter back to it. Furthermore, I need you to more clearly relate the controversies in the letters to the modern controversy. You tell me that the “public needed to form an opinion,” but tell me WHY the public thought it needed to form the opinion. Tell me what freedoms are at stake in these controversies. What is the common theme between the letters and modern controversies? Answer this single question and you will demonstrate a sufficient relation between the two. Once you have made these minor adjustments to your post, it will be up to prompt standards.

    Adam

    To receive a grade of “S,” satisfactory revision must be posted by 11:59 P.M. Thursday October 17.

  2. I would like to let you know that I have updated my post even though the date or anything hasn’t changed for some reason. I just want you to be aware that it has been updated according to your commentary provided and I would like to be considered for a satisfactory grade. Thanks.

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